What is the Enlightenment in simple terms?

Definition of enlightenment 1 : the act or means of enlightening : the state of being enlightened. 2 capitalized : a philosophical movement of the 18th century marked by a rejection of traditional social, religious, and political ideas and an emphasis on rationalism —used with the.

What was the main idea of the Enlightenment?

The Enlightenment, a philosophical movement that dominated in Europe during the 18th century, was centered around the idea that reason is the primary source of authority and legitimacy, and advocated such ideals as liberty, progress, tolerance, fraternity, constitutional government, and separation of church and state.

What is the Enlightenment and why is it important?

“The Enlightenment” has been regarded as a turning point in the intellectual history of the West. The principles of religious tolerance, optimism about human progress and a demand for rational debate are often thought to be a powerful legacy of the ideas of Locke, Newton, Voltaire and Diderot.

What are Enlightenment beliefs?

The Enlightenment included a range of ideas centered on the value of human happiness, the pursuit of knowledge obtained by means of reason and the evidence of the senses, and ideals such as liberty, progress, toleration, fraternity, constitutional government, and separation of church and state.

What’s an example of the Enlightenment?

An example of enlightenment is when you become educated about a particular course of study or a particular religion. An example of enlightenment was The Age of Enlightenment, a time in Europe during the 17th and 18th century considered an intellectual movement driven by reason.

How did the Enlightenment changed the world?

The Enlightenment helped combat the excesses of the church, establish science as a source of knowledge, and defend human rights against tyranny. It also gave us modern schooling, medicine, republics, representative democracy, and much more.

What is an example of Enlightenment?